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Judge in Aaron Hernandez case will allow some jailhouse phone calls 03.25.15 at 1:07 pm ET
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Superior Court Judge Susan Garsh said Wednesday she will allow some of Aaron Hernandez’s phone calls from jail to be used by the prosecution in its murder case against the former Patriot.

Hernandez’s lawyers had asked for those conversations — including those with his fiancee and Dolphins offensive lineman Mike Pouncey (a former University of Florida teammate) — to be excluded. The prosecution said it did not plan to use the calls with Pouncey.

Garsh said she would rule later on which calls could be included.

Also Wednesday, Garsh said prosecutors are “about a week or so” away from resting their case in the trial, which has gone on for eight weeks.

Hernandez is accused of killing Odin Lloyd in June 2013.

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Witness: Aaron Hernandez ‘aggressive’ in nightclub 2 nights before killing 03.20.15 at 9:28 am ET
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In the Aaron Hernandez trial on Thursday, a woman who had been dancing with Hernandez in Rumor nightclub two nights prior to the killing of Odin Lloyd offered her testimony. Lloyd was with the former NFLer that night and prosecutors have said that Hernandez let the club angry.

The woman, Kasey Arma, said that she had seen Hernandez about a half-dozen times prior to that evening and that he attempted to get her attention by tapping on her hip. After first ignoring him, she then turned to talk to him. He introduced himself as Rock and asked to dance with her. They did for 5-10 minutes before Hernandez left in the middle of the song, telling her he would be right back.

According to Arma, when Hernandez came back roughly 10 minutes later, he was acting much differently than he had before. She said he was being more aggressive, that he brought her next to the main door and told her to dance.

“His whole demeanor was just very different: very on edge, aggressive and kind of arrogant,” she said.

Hernandez’s lawyers played a video of the two dancing by the doorway, in which they talked every so often and then parted ways. Arma said that he was being too aggressive so she didn’t want to dance with him anymore, and after being questioned by defense lawyer Michael Fee, she said that she did not like him after that night and had been talking to him to pump up her ego. She cited his arrogance specifically as something she took issue with.

In addition, another of Hernandez’s lawyers, James Sultan, went after the footprint evidence in the case that had been presented days before, asking how it was collected and matched with Hernandez’s shoes from that night. Massachusetts State Police Lt. Steven Bennett had said that the footprint found at the scene matched the print of the shoe Hernandez was wearing. He also said that he knew a colleague wanted him to link the print with the ex-Patriot before he made the match.

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Footprints found at crime scene same as those of Aaron Hernandez’s shoe, according to Nike expert 03.18.15 at 11:07 am ET
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The main developments to come out of the Aaron Hernandez trial on Tuesday were that the prosecution presented an acquaintance of Hernandez’s who said the former Patriot looked angry when he was with the victim, Odin Lloyd, at a club a few days before the killing, and a Nike specialist said Hernandez was wearing the same kind of shoes that left a footprint at the scene of the crime.

Hernandez’s defense lawyer, Michael Fee, questioned the credibility of the acquaintance, Kwami Nicholas, who the defense established had never met Hernandez before that night, and Fee found discrepancies between what Nicholas told police in 2013 and the testimony he gave on Tuesday. Fee also asked Nicholas if he had familiarity with Hernandez’s facial expressions or mannerisms since he had never met him before, and Nicholas said that he was ‘”familiar with human expression,” but not Hernandez’s specifically.

Herbert Hughes, a Nike consultant, said that Hernandez was wearing Nike Air Jordan 11 Lows in both the surveillance video in his home about 10 minutes after the killing and in the video of him at the gas station 90 minutes prior. Prosecutors said that the footprints at the scene were left by that type of shoe, but defense lawyer James Sultan said that there are more than 3 million shoes with that sole. Hedges noted that Hernandez’s size 13 was more uncommon and that the sole for that size of shoe would be different from smaller ones.

Video was shown of a set of headlights on its way to the industrial park where Lloyd was found, but the quality was so bad that the number of people in the car or its type could not be identified.

Prosecutors believe that Hernandez’s fiancee, Shayanna Jenkins, hid the shoes at some point.

On Wednesday morning the trial focused on a handful of witnesses, according to Bob McGovern of the Boston Herald, the first of which was Scott Bazinet, a surveillance camera installer. The following was Paul Belham, who owns a business near the industrial park and had some security footage of headlights passing by. Christopher Mitchell of the North Attleboro Electric Company, next on the stand, also had footage that was clearer than some others but still not definitive.

Steve Bennett of the Massachusetts State Police Crime Services Unit was next, and he had been involved with the investigation for a while. He described the crime scene for much of his testimony.

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Judge in Aaron Hernandez trial won’t allow reference to Florida shooting 03.04.15 at 12:32 pm ET
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In Day 20 of the Aaron Hernandez trial, Judge Susan Garsh reiterated that she will not allow prosecutors to introduce evidence related to the shooting of a Hernandez friend in Florida a few months before Odin Lloyd was murdered.

Alexander Bradley said he was shot by Hernandez in February 2013 while riding in a car with the then-Patriots tight end. Prosecutors asked the judge to revisit her initial ruling against introducing it, saying it contradicts the defense’s claim that Hernandez would not shoot a friend, but she would not change her mind.

Also Wednesday, Massachusetts State Police trooper and fingerprint analyst David Mackin returned to the stand after testifying Tuesday.

Mackin had said in his testimony on Tuesday that Odin Lloyd and Hernandez’s fingerprints were found inside the Nissan Altima that Hernandez rented. Specifically, he found that Lloyd’s prints were on the handle of the rear passenger side door, while Hernandez’s were on the inside handle of the driver’s side.

He was asked on Wednesday more questions about the car and the prints he processed.

After Mackin stepped down, MSP crime lab staffer Sherri Menendez, who supervises forensic chemists in an MSP crime lab, took the stand. Menendez analyzed five shell casings, a firearm and two magazines.

On Tuesday, a maid cleaning Hernandez’s house, Glaucia Santos, testified that, the day after the killing, she saw him touching the security camera in his basement while cleaning a bathroom. During cross-examination, though, defense attorney Michael Fee suggested that she would not have seen him tampering with the camera from where she was based on the basement’s layout.

Prosecutors also showed the jury text messages on Tuesday that Hernandez and Lloyd had exchanged hours before the shooting. The texts all showed that Hernandez wanted to meet up with Lloyd that night.

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Testimony: Aaron Hernandez smoked, tallied expensive bar tab night of murder 02.26.15 at 3:19 pm ET
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Thursday during the Odin Lloyd murder trial it was learned Aaron Hernandez and the group he was with spent $273 plus $30 tip at a bar and was asked by the bar manager to stop smoking marijuana on the street outside the bar on the night of the murder.

Also shown to the jury on Thursday was a video showing Hernandez putting gas in his Nissan Altima and dancing in the parking lot — all this according to NECN’€™s Kathryn Sotnik.

Hernandez is being charged in the murder of Lloyd. The trial began Jan. 9.

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Policeman testifies that casing found in Aaron Hernandez’s vehicle matches those found at murder scene 02.25.15 at 1:04 pm ET
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The murder weapon in the Odin Lloyd shooting has not been located, but on Wednesday a Massachusetts State Police sergeant testified in court that the shell casing found in Aaron Hernandez’s rental car matched ones found at the murder scene.

At Hernandez’s trial in Fall River, Sgt. Stephen Walsh said the casing found inside Hernandez’s Nissan Altima by an employee of the rental car company and the five found at the scene were fired by the same gun — a Glock.

The defense responded by claiming bullets fired by a Glock can’t be identified like that.

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Another juror dismissed in Aaron Hernandez case 02.11.15 at 1:16 pm ET
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For the second time in two weeks, a juror was dismissed from the Aaron Hernandez trial in Fall River.

Judge Susan Garsh told remaining jurors after Wednesday’s short morning session it was “for reasons that were entirely personal to that juror. It has nothing to do with this case.”

The panel now has 16 jurors, 12 of whom will decide Hernandez’s guilt or innocence in the 2013 killing of Odin Lloyd.

Wednesday’s session was the first since last Thursday. Jurors routed Hernandez’s home and the crime scene on Friday, and snow forced postponement of sessions on Monday and Tuesday.

The trial will resume Friday.

During Wednesday’s session, Shayanna Jenkins, Hernandez’s fiancee, was in her usual seat behind Hernandez, and the two showed their affection toward each other. Jenkins was given immunity Tuesday, which means she can be forced to testify or face jail time.

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