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With coaching vacancies in Foxboro, these names could be in mix for Patriots 01.23.14 at 1:44 pm ET
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With the recent exodus of coaches from the Patriots€™ staff — linebackers coach Pepper Johnson, offensive line coach Dante Scarnecchia and tight ends coach George Godsey have departed — here are seven individuals could be the mix in Foxboro for either a new job with the Patriots or a promotion within the franchise.

Jim Schwartz — The former Lions head coach has been tight with Bill Belichick for several years. He worked with Belichick in Cleveland — the turkey sandwich story has been told and retold a million times (scroll down for the full tale) — before moving on to become a defensive coach for the Ravens and Titans. He was the head coach in Detroit from 2009 through 2013. Based on his work as a linebackers coach, he could be a candidate to take over for Johnson.

Greg Schiano — One of a handful of former college coaches Belichick cultivated a relationship with — Schiano was at Rutgers before moving to the Buccaneers, who fired him this month — Schiano reportedly is in the mix for the Browns head coaching job. If he doesn’t land with Cleveland, he could make his way to Foxboro to work on the defensive side of the ball. (One thing to remember when considering Schwartz and Schiano — Belichick has been very kind in the past to former head coaches who need a one-year, transitional job as assistants before they jump back into working as a coordinator or head coach. See Dom Capers.)

Brian Daboll — Daboll is already in the system, having returned last year to work as a vaguely defined “offensive assistant.” We know he had his fingerprints on several aspects of the offense in 2013 — for what it’€™s worth, during training camp, he was working extensively with the offensive line as well as Tim Tebow. (Remember him?) He wasn’t named to replace Scarnecchia as the offensive line coach but could move into Godsey’€™s role with the tight ends, or continue to serve as an unofficial offensive adviser.

Jerry Schlupinski — The Patriots have a track record of promoting from within, and if they go that route, Schlupisnki — a coaching assistant who joined the franchise in 2013 — could be their guy who has an expanded route in 2014. His pedigree is similar to personnel chief Nick Caserio and offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels in that he made his bones at John Carroll University in Ohio — in fact, he played alongside them as a collegian. (He also worked at JCU as a coach.)

Joe Judge — Currently the assistant special teams coach, he could be another candidate to be promoted from within to take over one of the available positional vacancies. Judge has worked under special teams coach Scott O’€™Brien the last two seasons and has an impressive resume, having spent time as an assistant under Nick Saban at Alabama.

Patrick Graham — After spending a season as the defensive line coach, Graham could be shuffled back to the linebacker spot to take over for Johnson. (He was linebackers coach in 2011.) Then they would hire someone else to take over at defensive line. The Yale product joined the organization as a coaching assistant in 2009 and has worked as a defensive assistant as well as a linebackers and defensive line coach.

Matt Patricia — Graham’€™s coaching flexibility could also open up an expanded role for Patricia. It’€™s conceivable the Patriots could have Patricia handle a position grouping in addition to his current work as a coordinator. (They’ve done it for several seasons on the offensive side of the ball, where both Bill O’€™Brien and McDaniels have served the dual role of quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator.) Patricia also has experience coaching the linebackers, as he was there from 2006-10.

Read More: Brian Daboll, Dante Scarnecchia, George Godsey, Greg Schiano
If Josh McDaniels leaves for Cleveland, who could take over as Patriots offensive coordinator? 12.31.13 at 6:53 pm ET
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If offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels does ultimately decide to leave the Patriots for the head coaching job in Cleveland, here are four possible plans for New England going forward when it comes to the OC job.

Chad O’€™Shea: He was hired as New England’€™s receivers coach on Feb. 25, 2009, and while the franchise has struggled at times when it comes to drafting and developing at the position, he’€™s had a good run of success with the players under his tutelage as of late. This year, he was able to oversee the integration of newcomers like Danny Amendola, Kenbrell Thompkins, Aaron Dobson and Josh Boyce into the passing game, while veterans like Julian Edelman and Wes Welker have both publicly expressed their support for O’€™Shea. The 41-year-old has also worked as an offensive assistant with the wide receivers for the Vikings (2006-08). He started his NFL coaching career with the Chiefs, where he served as a volunteer special teams assistant in 2003 and assisted with special teams and linebackers for two seasons from 2004-05.

Brian Daboll: Daboll made his bones with the Patriots from 2001-2006 as a wide receivers coach, helping youngsters like Deion Branch and David Givens become impactful pass catchers. He also spent time as a defensive assistant in New England before working with the Jets, Browns, Dolphins and Chiefs as either a quarterbacks coach or offensive coordinator. He returned to the franchise this year as a vaguely named ‘€œoffensive coaching assistant,’€ and has held a variety of responsibilities over the course of the 2013 season. (For what it’€™s worth, he appeared to spend a lot of time during training camp with the offensive line, as well as old pal Tim Tebow.) Based on his resume, his background in the New England system, and his working relationship with the rest of the coaching staff, the 38-year-old could likely make the most seamless transition into the OC job. In addition, it would allow other offensive assistants to stay in their current jobs, creating more continuity on the coaching staff going forward.

Bill Belichick: It’€™s always a very real possibility that the Patriots decide not to name a coordinator. They’€™ve done it before — including in 2011, when they decided not to name a defensive coordinator, even though Matt Patricia had essentially taken over as the DC in waiting. If the Patriots can’€™t find someone they feel good about, at least at this point, they could go without for a year or two, assign more overall responsibility to a younger assistant like O’€™Shea or Daboll, and if it looks like they have taken to the job, officially name them OC in a year or two.

Nick Caserio: No one has a more extensive background at just about every level of the organization that Caserio — the 38-year-old has worked as an assistant coach, scout, and is currently the director of player personnel. He joined the franchise in 2001 as a personnel assistant, and became an offensive coaching assistant in 2002 before moving on as a scout in 2003. He served as the team’€™s director of pro personnel from 2004 through 2006 before taking a year to return to the field, this time as the wide receivers coach. He returned to the front office in 2008, and has held his current position with the Patriots since then. (In terms of game-day logistics, he has called offensive plays in the past, and has sat upstairs in the booth on game days.) Caserio could be a temporary fix — if the Patriots wants to promote from within but they don’€™t believe someone like O’€™Shea is quite ready, Caserio could get the call.

Read More: Bill Belichick, Brian Daboll, Chad O'Shea, Josh McDaniels
Patriots leaning on plenty of coaching, both official and unofficial, through spring sessions 06.05.13 at 12:25 pm ET
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While the Patriots are rightly acknowledged as annually having one of the smallest coaching staffs in the league, they also continue to take on more unofficial advisers and assistants than many other teams.

Over the course of OTAs this spring, several coaches and former players (guys who played for Bill Belichick at multiple spots) were on the field working with players. Former Belichick players have always been welcome on the fields of Foxboro, regardless of whether or not they wore a Patriots uniform. Last summer, former Giants linebacker Carl Banks was spotted on the field during training camp in Patriots gear, working with former Giants teammate Pepper Johnson. The color commentator for the Giants radio team drew the ire of some New York fans for the decision.

On Tuesday, that group includes former offensive lineman Joe Andruzzi (who has worked in an advisory role in the past with the offensive linemen) and defensive lineman Anthony Pleasant, who played for Belichick in Cleveland and New England. They joined a group on the field that included longtime Belichick consigliere Ernie Adams, player personnel chief Nick Caserio (both of whom are a fairly constant presence on the field over the last few years) and Brian Daboll, who is listed on the masthead merely as an ‘€œoffensive assistant’€ in his first full year back with the Patriots.

Daboll is an intriguing figure — a former wide receivers coach in New England from 2002-06, he left to serve as an assistant with the Jets, Browns, Dolphins and Chiefs. No one outside the organization is quite sure what his role will be — Belichick said on draft weekend that ‘€œwe didn’€™t bring him in here to tape ankles’€ — but during the most recent round of OTAs, it appeared he was working with the offensive line on a fairly consistent basis.

Longtime offensive line coach Dante Scarnecchia welcomes the chance to work with Daboll on a regular basis again.

‘€œI’€™ve known Brian a long time — 12 years,’€ Scarnecchia said Tuesday. ‘€œHe’€™s a really good football coach and he’€™s helping wherever he can. I really enjoy our time together.’€

That sentiment was echoed by running backs coach Ivan Fears, who — like Scarnecchia — got a chance to know Daboll in his first tour with the Patriots.

‘€œWe always could use another good football coach,’€ Fears said of the 38-year-old Daboll. ‘€œThe guy has got the experience that he’€™s got — been a coordinator in the league, seeing the things he’€™s seen, attack the defenses that he’€™s attacked. It’€™s always nice to have a guy like that around. It really is. So I’€™m excited to have a guy like that around. Especially he was here a long time ago with me, so we’€™re pretty close. I’€™m always happy to see Brian around.’€

Despite the fact that the Patriots coaching staff underwent minimal turnover this offseason, the chance for someone to bring a fresh perspective to a scenario — at least, a perspective that’€™s been out of the building for a few years — can be helpful.

‘€œBrian brings a great, fresh mindset into our meetings,’€ said offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels. ‘€œHe can add to every group in our room. I pick his brain daily. He’€™s a really good resource to have here. What an addition for us to get him back and have him help us get better every day.’€

Read More: Bill Belichick, Brian Daboll,
Eight things we’re going to be looking for at Patriots OTAs 05.20.13 at 3:18 pm ET
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The Patriots opened organized team activities Monday — NFL-speak for full-squad, low-intensity get-togethers that will give us an opportunity to see the rookies and (many of the) veterans on the field together for the first time. (The media will have access to Tuesday’s workout.)

With the understanding that it will be impossible to make any wide, sweeping judgments of substance on any player because of the slow-speed nature of things (and with the knowledge that, at least according to reports, linebacker Brandon Spikes isn’t there), here are eight things we’re going to be keeping an eye on when we hit Foxboro Tuesday morning.

Tom Brady: The whole thing begins and ends with the quarterback, and while we don’t expect to necessarily be surprised by anything he might be doing, it’s always interesting to see where he is, both physically and mentally. One thing to watch will be how he does when it comes to working with the new faces, particularly at wide receiver. Another will be to keep an eye on his mechanics and any sport of tinkering he’s done with his delivery, something he discussed at great length with Peter King.

The rookies, specifically, Jamie Collins and Josh Boyce: We want to get a look at both of these guys because they’re both such athletic freaks, but Collins intrigues because he may end up playing more of a role in coverage, at least right out of the gate. As for Boyce, he missed rookie minicamp because of a foot issue, and as a result, this should mark his first time on the field with the rest of his teammates in an organized setting.

The tight ends, specifically, Jake Ballard: With Rob Gronkowski expected to be on the shelf at least through the spring, Ballard should certainly get plenty of reps at Gronkowski’s spot in the next month as he works his way back from spending the 2012 season on the sidelines because of a knee issue. It’s important to have a set of realistic expectations for Ballard — he not only spent the entire year on the shelf because of a knee injury he sustained in Super Bowl XLVI, he’s also joining a new system. Regardless, he’ll be interesting to watch. (In that same vein, we’ll also be watching linebacker Dane Fletcher and cornerback Ras-I Dowling, two other players who ended their season on injured reserve.)

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Read More: Brian Daboll, Jake Ballard, LeGarrette Blount, Tom Brady
Patriots bringing Brian Daboll back to coaching staff 01.14.13 at 12:00 pm ET
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FOXBORO — In a move similar to bringing back Josh McDaniels during last year’s playoff run as an offensive coaching assistant, Patriots head coach Bill Belichick announced Monday that Brian Daboll is in the process of rejoining the coaching staff. Belichick said Daboll’s role hasn’t been specified yet.

“[It's] similar to what Josh did last year but without any specific responsibility at this time,” Belichick said in announcing the move during Monday’s conference call with reporters. “As soon as we get that worked out, he’€™ll be part of our coaching staff going forward.”

Daboll was first with the Patriots in the early 2000s, serving as a defensive coaching assistant in 2000. He then worked with McDaniels and coached the wide receivers from 2002-06.

“It’€™s great to have Brian back,” McDaniels said. “He’€™s a very good football coach, very knowledgeable and can help us a will certainly help us in a lot of different ways. Certainly having another set of eyes with experience and has a lot of understanding of our system and how we go about doing things, I think, is only a positive for us and can help our football team going forward. I look forward to doing that with Brian.

“Last year when I came back, really anything they asked me to do, I was excited to do. You know, anything you can do to help at this time of year is useful, whether that’€™s drawing practice cards or sitting in a meeting and having a few ideas on a certain situation in the game plan or anything like that during the course of a week. Everything is so important; every detail is very critical at this time of year and having another football coach on your staff to help is nothing but helpful for us.”

Daboll left New England and joined the staff of head coach Eric Mangini with the Jets and served as quarterbacks coach in 2007-08.

After leaving the Jets, Daboll became the Browns offensive coordinator from 2009-10. He had the same job with the Dolphins (2011) and the Chiefs this past season.

Belichick is very familiar with him, as he served as a graduate assistant for Nick Saban at Michigan State from 1998-99.

Read More: Bill Belichick, Brian Daboll, Cleveland Browns, Eric Mangini
Has former Patriots assistant Brian Daboll already gotten the Dolphins into trouble? 03.01.11 at 4:20 pm ET
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Interesting goings on down in Miami ‘€” Dolphins quarterback Chad Henne talked to the media about new offensive coordinator Brian Daboll, and sounded excited about the new direction that they plan on taking down in Miami. Daboll, a former Patriots assistant, is installing a new system with the Dolphins, one that Henne describes as ‘€œsimilar to what I was used to at Michigan. It’€™s a New England offense ‘€” New England with a little Jets in it. It’€™s a good offense for a quarterback.’€

No shock there, as Daboll made his bones as an assistant under Bill Belichick in New England. Daboll served as the Patriots’€™ defensive coaching assistant from 2000 to 2001, and then was the wide receivers’€™ coach from 2002 until 2006. (He was one of the assistants who left with Eric Mangini, becoming the Jets’€™ quarterbacks coach in 2007 and 2008, and later, serving as Mangini’s offensive coordinator with the Browns in 2009 and 2010.)

However, the voluntary meetings between Henne and Daboll ‘€” get-togethers that are apparently designed to have Henne help install the offense with the other Dolphins in case of a lockout ‘€” appear to be in violation of the collective bargaining agreement, as interpreted by a recent NFL memo to each team that said players are not to meet with coaches and receive playbooks during this time in the offseason. Henne’s declaration could put Miami coach Tony Sparano in jeopardy of an NFL fine. (UPDATE: It appears that the Dolphins will not be punished, according to Jeff Darlington of the Miami Herald.)

Of course, many former New England players and executives probably aren’€™t surprised that something like this has happened to Daboll. When Daboll was initially hired by Miami, former Patriots fullback Heath Evans took a shot at the hiring, saying, ‘€œThe Dolphins probably just got worse. ‘€¦ When he was in New England, he was never a guy that I would have considered the brains of the operation.’€ And at the NFL scouting combine over the weekend, former Patriots’€™ GM Scott Pioli was asked by Miami reporters what his memories of Daboll were when they were together in New England.

‘€œI remember that [Daboll] was a part of a great deal of success there,’€ Pioli said, simply. Whoa.

For their part, the Dolphins are backing Daboll. This past weekend at the NFL scouting combine in Indianapolis, GM Jeff Ireland said Daboll’€™s track record was what sold him on Miami.

‘€œHis history with quarterbacks, his history being a defensive coach and offensive coach. Coach Sparano and myself were really impressed with the way he put a plan together for our offensive players on the football team,’€ Ireland said. ‘€œI wasn’€™t necessarily looking at what his production was with Cleveland. I know there were some things there that were different, but we’€™ve got different personnel and the way he presented his play with us with our personnel was very impressive.’€

In addition, quarterback Chad Pennington ‘€” who played for Daboll in New York and was in Miami the last three seasons in Miami ‘€” said Daboll was a tremendous teacher.

‘€œA lot of the coverage knowledge that I have and understanding defenses comes from Brian,’€ Pennington recently told the Palm Beach Post. ‘€œThe year I spent with him, I just learned so much about how defenses attack offenses and all of the nuances of coverage that I didn’€™t understand before.’€

Read More: Brian Daboll, Chad Henne, Chad Pennington, Eric Mangini
Browns’ defensive coordinator Rob Ryan reflects on time with Belichick, Pats 11.05.10 at 7:44 pm ET
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He is the other Ryan, less bombastic than his twin brother but no less respected in NFL circles.

Cleveland defensive coordinator Rob Ryan, the twin brother of Jets coach Rex Ryan, will get the chance to lead the Browns’€™ defense against the Patriots on Sunday. Like many Cleveland coaches, Ryan’€™s ties to New England run deep ‘€” he was the Patriots linebackers coach from 2000 to 2003 before leaving New England to become defensive coordinator in Oakland from 2004 through 2008.

Prior to the start of last season, Ryan joined Eric Mangini‘€™s staff in Cleveland, part of a group of former Patriots assistants ‘€” including Mangini, offensive coordinator Brian Daboll and special-teams coach Brad Seely ‘€” who have migrated to Cleveland to try and implement the New England system on the shores of Lake Erie.

In his weekly press conference with Cleveland-area reporters on Friday, Ryan recalled his early days with the Patriots where the team wasn’€™t yet where it wanted to be. In particular, the 2000 season wasn’€™t what Ryan was expecting.

‘€œShoot, we had a rough start when we were 5-11 out there. I was questioning it like, ‘€˜Man, I thought this was going to be a little different,’€™’€œ Ryan recalled Friday. ‘€œThings were a little bleak there and everybody was calling for [head coach Bill] Belichick‘€™s head and everything else like that.’€

The nadir of that season was a 19-11 loss in Cleveland, a contest where the Browns’€™ fans jeered Belichick in his first time back in Cleveland as an opposing head coach. It dropped the Patriots to 2-8.

‘€œI just remember that it was just an awful game. Cleveland got the better of us in about everything they did. They played better on defense, offense, special teams and according to Belichick, which I’€™m sure he was right, coaching,’€ Ryan said. ‘€I can remember getting off of that plane and having a meeting and we just got ripped from one side down to the next.
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Read More: Bill Belichick, Brad Seely, Brian Daboll, Eric Mangini
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